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THE FUTURE
OF SPORT

Technology is transforming sport at a lightning-fast pace – and it’s accelerating every day. Imagine a world where in-game fitness monitoring becomes the norm in football, or elite tennis players can boost their serve speed by 10% with a super-lightweight racket.

We spoke to an expert, Applied Futurist Tom Cheesewright, who provided insight as to what the future holds for five of the worlds’ most iconic sports. Join us as we track the history of sport and reveal the technology predicted to revolutionise the worlds of football, tennis, F1 and more.

CHOOSE YOUR SPORT...

TOM CHEESEWRIGHT

Applied Futurist

As one of the UK’s leading commentators on tomorrow’s technology, Tom helps individuals and organisations around the globe design futureproof plans in response to change. His foresight has seen him featured on the BBC, ITV and Sky News, as well as publications including The Guardian and The Times.

1863
THE START OF SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL

The rules of the beautiful game are formed in England by the Football Association, followed by the first official game the very same year in London’s Mortlake suburb.

2018
VIDEO ASSISTANT REFEREE IS A GAMECHANGER

The International Football Association Board officially approved Video Assistant Referee (VAR) for use in games. The technology made its World Cup debut in Russia.

2025
PRIME PERFORMANCE MONITORING
Tom says:

“In-game player fitness monitoring, combining worn sensors with video gait analysis will feed real-time information to coaches about fatigue and injuries. This means we could see players taken off before an injury or excessive fatigue occurs.”

Tom says:

“Performance-enhancing boots and strips that reduce fatigue in the major lower muscle groups could be the norm, thus enhancing performance for running, heading and kicking. Assistive head-up virtual screens providing tactical information could guide players making free kicks while training.”

2050
FOOTBALL
REBOOTED
2050
FOOTBALL
REBOOTED
Tom says:

“Performance-enhancing boots and strips that reduce fatigue in the major lower muscle groups could be the norm, thus enhancing performance for running, heading and kicking. Assistive head-up virtual screens providing tactical information could guide players making free kicks while training.”